Weird Clam Profile: Pinna nobilis

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A fan mussel among the seagrass it calls home (Arnaud Abadie on Flickr)

The fan mussels (Pinna nobilis) are a species of enormous mussel which live in seagrass beds of the Mediterranean Sea. They can grow to nearly 4 feet long (though most are 1-2 feet in size at maturity), and live with most of their bodies protruding straight up out of the sediment, anchored down into the sand with long rootlike byssal threads which grow out of their rear hinge.

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They are really enormous (Marc Arenas Camps on WordPress)

These mussels grow up to 20 cm per year, almost entirely in the vertical direction. As they gain in mass, their bodies start to sink in the sand beneath them, so it is believed this extremely fast growth rate evolved in order to stay above the sediment. It also helps them to remain elevated above the seagrass around them, where they can access passing phytoplankton and organic particles in the current.

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A sea silk glove (Wikipedia)
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Close up view of the hairlike byssus. I definitely am feeling some beard envy here. (Wikipedia)

Because they are exposed to the current like a giant fan, they need a very strong anchor. So they create huge quantities of byssal threads which root them down in the sand. These byssal threads are known as as “sea silk” and communities around the Mediterranean have used the silk to sew clothing for thousands of years. The material is extremely fine but strong, and has historically been of immense value as a result. Sea silk or sea wool is mentioned in writings of the ancient Egyptians, Greeks and Romans.

Unfortunately, the fan mussels are considered critically endangered due to overharvesting, pollution, climate change and destruction of their native seagrass habitats. However, they are now protected and active conservation efforts are underway. When the cruise ship Costa Concordia ran aground off of Italy in 2012, a community of fan mussels were rescued from a seagrass bed next to the wreck and moved to another nearby site. I hope someday to study the fan mussels because I find them to be a truly charismatic bivalve with many interesting mysteries still waiting to be uncovered about their unique lifestyle.

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Huge pen shell I saw at the Hebrew University Museum in Jerusalem. My lens cap is only 6 cm to give you a sense of scale! The shells are fragile and easily break.

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